De Hart Hubbard

Image by Sharmeeyn♡Kefee

De Hart Hubbard (1903-1976) was born in Cincinnati, Ohio and named William De Hart Hubbard after A. J. De Hart, the first principal of the Douglass School. De Hart attended the Douglass School and first discovered his athletic abilities there as he started running track.  He was not successful at first but he was determined to succeed.  By the time he graduated from the Douglass School he was a champion runner. 

Image by Sharmeeyn♡Kefee

He attended Walnut Hills High School exhibiting excellence in track and other sports, graduating with the highest scholastic record of any boy in his class of 1921. Due to prejudice, he was barred from playing on the football team at the beginning of the season his senior year by the athletic board governing city high school athletics. The team had already played one game but refused to play the rest of the season protesting this unfair ruling.

Image by Sharmeeyn♡Kefee

By the spring of his senior year the ruling was reversed and he was able to play on the baseball team and participate as their star track team member and captain, winning and setting records in board-jump, high-hurdles, discus-throwing and the 100-yard dash. The Walnut Hills yearbook remembers De Hart Hubbard as a stellar athlete, encouraging others and winning the respect of his school and their competitors.

Image by Sharmeeyn♡Kefee

He was awarded the Enquirer college scholarship and attended the University of Michigan. In 1922, while a student of the University of Michigan, he broke the running broad jump record with a leap of 24 feet, 3 ½ inches, beating the 1914 record of 24 feet, 1 inch. While participating on the 1924 Olympic team, he won the gold medal in the running broad-jump, the first Olympic gold for an African-American in an individual event.  Later that year he broke the record for the broad-jump as a University of Michigan senior with a distance of 25 feet 10 3/4 inches. He also set records in the fifty, sixty, sixty-five and one hundred-yard dashes.

After graduation from the University of Michigan he became a supervisor in the Department of Colored Work for the Cincinnati Public Recreation Commission.  De Hart Hubbard also founded the Cincinnati Tigers, a Negro League baseball team. He later moved to Cleveland and worked as a race relations adviser for the Federal Housing Authority. William De Hart Hubbard died on June 23, 1976, in Cleveland, Ohio.

XxSharmeeyn 💋

More...