We always see pretty faces in Hollywood, but the beautiful Audrey Hepburn was way more than that. Born Audrey Kathleen Ruston on May 1929, Audrey spent her childhood traveling due of her father's job, she was a privilaged kid and learned to speak five languages: Dutch and English from her parents, and later varying degrees of French, Spanish, and Italian. Her father left the family in 1935 to get involved with facist activity and never visited Audrey. She then moved to Kent, England.

During World War II, her and her family relocated on Arnhem in the hope that, as during World War I, the Netherlands would remain neutral and be spared a German attack. There she learned ballet. When Germany invaded the Netherlands, Audrey used the name Edda van Heemstra, because an "English-sounding" name was considered dangerous during the German occupation since Britain declared war on Germany. Her family was affected drastically, she starved for years and said that her family "should've shot themselves", her uncle was executated in retaliation for an act of sabotage by the resistance movement; while he had not been involved in the act, he was targeted due to his family's prominence in Dutch society. Audrey even said that she felt really identified after reading Anna's Frank diary.

After the war ended in 1945, Hepburn moved with her mother and siblings to Amsterdam, where she began ballet training under Sonia Gaskell, a leading figure in Dutch ballet, and Russian Olga Tarassova. Her family fortune was lost during the war, so to support herself she worked as a model. She moved to London and there she was told because of her height and contexture (caused by wartime malnutrition) she would not go really far as a ballerina. She then concentred on acting.

During her sucessfull acting career in the 50s she never forgot to give to others, she narrated two radio programmes for UNICEF, re-telling children's stories of war. Then she became a Goodwill Ambassador of UNICEF. On her appointment, she stated that she was grateful for receiving international aid after enduring the German occupation as a child, and wanted to show her gratitude to the organisation. She visited Turkey, South America, Ethiopia and Bangladesh.
United States president George H. W. Bush presented Hepburn with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in recognition of her work with UNICEF, and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences posthumously awarded her the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award for her contribution to humanityUnited States president George H. W. Bush presented Hepburn with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in recognition of her work with UNICEF, and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences posthumously awarded her the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award for her contribution to humanity. at the United Nations Special Session on Children, UNICEF honoured Hepburn's legacy of humanitarian work by unveiling a statue, "The Spirit of Audrey", at UNICEF's New York headquarters. Her service for children is also recognised through the US Fund for UNICEF's Audrey Hepburn Society.

Hepburn renewed contact with her father after locating him in Dublin through the Red Cross; although he remained emotionally detached, Hepburn supported him financially until his death.

"The beauty of a woman is seen in her eyes because that is the doorway to her heart, the place where love resides." - Audrey Hepburn

- @stillfeelinglove