Dear Hearters,

I don't know if it's just me but I love a good prologue. To me, it's a wonderful insight into what I'm about to read, the scene has just been set, maybe a character has been introduced - maybe not, maybe it's a past event or maybe it's present day. The point is, a prologue attracts the reader intentionally, like hey look at me, you want more?.

Your prologue is like a blurb but structured like a chapter.

So if you want to entice your readers with a sneak peek of your novel, then follow these simple rules.

1. SET YOUR P.O.V (Point Of View)

Now, this seems obvious enough, you already know what point of view you want your book so why would I need to worry about setting one for the prologue.

Well, Well, Well people sometimes you have to sit down and think, will my prologue convey my message better with first person or third or even narrator. Sometimes you think one point of view is the best until you try something else and you realise that it is in fact better.

For Example;

"She's going to die, the odds didn't seem to be in her favour. She's strapped tightly to a chair by her upper body; legs and arms, glaring through the narrow slits in her hair at Zephyrus slumped in the seat in front of her, his left arm rested on the top of the chair while the other hung down playing with a silver gun as if it were a playing baton. The swinging low hanging bulb was the only thing providing light in the dark room and not much of it anyway; just enough to see his features, the light shining on his stoic facade, a fresh cut underneath his eyes and his lips turned up in a mocking smirk as if he were waiting, waiting for her to beg for mercy at his feet..."

This third person is good but once transformed into first;

"I'm going to die now - but I think that's okay. I mean I'd always hoped to die in a different way – like everyone else – in a deep slumber, not aware of myself slipping away from reality but I guess that wasn't meant to be.
Instead I'm strapped tightly to a chair by my upper body; legs and arms, glaring through the narrow slits in my hair at Zephyrus slumped in a seat in front of me, his left arm rested on the top of the chair while the other hung down playing with a silver gun as if it were a playing baton. The swinging low hanging bulb is the only thing providing light in the dark room and not much of it anyway; just enough to see his features, the light shining on his stoic façade, a fresh cut underneath his eyes and his lips turned up in a mocking smirk as if he were waiting, waiting for me to beg for mercy at his feet, his stare is intense and uncomfortable and I find myself shifting around to somehow take myself away from it."
These are both extracts from a novel I am yet to publish.

This first person extract seems better because it allows more space for her feelings and emotion to be conveyed to the reader, therefore allowing them to want to know why she is feeling like she is.

Overall, I am not saying you must use one point of view over another, it is just beneficial to consider what you want to do.

2. SET THE SCENE PROPERLY

STOP! STOP! STOP! I have read enough books to last me a lifetime about someone waking up from a god awful dream or just waking up and doing their morning routine. I put my hands up to say that I am a victim of such a phenomenon, it seems logical and easy to start a novel like that. But I warn you it is flowery and you may just put your reader to sleep by it. So to escape this you could try one of these;

  • Start with a bang, it could be a car crash, a throwdown, a battle but you can quickly jumpstart your novel and reader by an epic start.
The car's a crumpled mess, my friends and family with it, but I have no time to mourn.The faint shadow lingering alerts me of his presence.
  • Start with a summary, maybe it could be a thought, a feeling, or maybe your character wants to tell the reader something.
She hasn't asked me how I feel about this - my mother that is. We're moving away from Kansas, I don't want to but she does.
  • Start with where your character is, you could describe where your character is, why they are there, what they feel about it.
The church looks more beautiful than I've ever seen it, white silk material draped over the chairs, hanging on the walls, covering every bit of brown. It's not winter but it's a white wedding. My white wedding.

3. CHECK YOUR RELEVANCE

This is rookie mistake 101. A prologue isn't just there for fun, it helps hint to secret information about a chapter upcoming. It allows you to somehow understand what is going on better. So if you talk about 1500 history then your book is about 2028 with no link at all between the years. Then honestly, what are you doing?

Trust me, it sounds like something that no one would do but you would be surprised. You could be so excited to write it, write about 2000 words then stop when you realize that there was no point of it at all.

So don't do that, put thought behind it.

4. DON'T FEEL FORCED

Now I love prologues don't get me wrong, but ask yourself sincerely, do I need a prologue? because if not then DO NOT WRITE ONE.

A big reason as to why your prologue may not be as good as you were hoping is because you put no effort into it, so unless you really need a prologue; please refrain from wasting your finger strength.

Not all amazing books need a prologue.

So remember;

  • POV
  • SET THE SCENE
  • RELEVANCE
  • DO I NEED IT?

Also, a link to some writing music, if ya need it.

https://open.spotify.com/user/217n5dp7uo4klv63yqcsmyekq/playlist/5gHqQAmluhQySVI46DQCiX

From,

A Fellow Hearter x

p.s, don't rush take your time. i'm known for rushing sometimes, i feel ya.


I really hope you have enjoyed this article and taken valuable tips from it. See you in the next article and message me what you want to see next.

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